Home Forums RAC Main Forum General Discussion Observing tonight?

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  • #14473
    Mike C:
    Keymaster

      Wow, that’s amazing! I managed to get that on my camera too. Mine camera is facing directly south, near Chester Woods park.

      #14478
      fealeybob14
      Participant

        The November Sky and Telescope issue features M33 a galaxy in Triangulum. Presently it is high in the eastern sky around midnight and its large size and galactic detail provides a good target for small telescopic astrophotography. Below is an image I obtained on 9-13 with AT 80ED mm refractor and ZWO 183M camera. 400 5sec frames were live stacked. Dark frame subtraction and some enhancement in Photoshop Elements was done.

        #14488
        fealeybob14
        Participant

          There are still a lot of artifacts in my pictures. I wonder if Mike C might comment on processing a FITS image file. When I try to do deep sky stacking of Light and Dark files I get an error message in ASI studio that it can only process one channel when I input the FITS color image file taken with the ASI color camera?! Also I couldn’t get DSS (latest version) or Registax 6 to process any of my FITS or TIF files (came out just a black screen when they are done).

          #14497
          fealeybob14
          Participant

            In the early morning of October 10th I finally observed and photographed M1 the Crab Nebula with my 80mm refractor. The photo below was taken with the ASI 183MC camera; 137, 5 second frames were stacked.

            #14499
            fealeybob14
            Participant

              Of course I had to take a look and photo of the magnificent Orion Nebula M 42 that was rising early am of Oct 10. The photo also taken with the ASI 183MC camera was 58 frames of 5 seconds each stacked and saved as FITS file.

              #14501
              fealeybob14
              Participant

                The same photo with a dark frame subtraction and Photoshop Elements processing is shown below.

                #14503
                bdavidson
                Participant

                  Bob: Can I publish your photos with descriptions in the newsletter?

                   

                  #14504
                  bwyman
                  Participant

                    Nice! It even has night sounds. Minus the bright flash of night, and the short duration, it might be as good as the 8 hour streaming video on Amazon Prime. 😛

                    That must have landed quite a bit south of us. The video looks very similar to mine, only the tree to my south blocked a bit more of it.

                    (Edit: This is not obvious in forum, but that was a reply to Mike C. video of the meteor.)

                    #14506
                    fealeybob14
                    Participant

                      To Bill Davidson above! Yes Bill I would be honored to have you publish the pictures. Details for the Crab Nebula are as follows:
                      Scope: Astro-Tech 80 mm ED refractor (AT80ED)
                      Mount: Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer GTi
                      Camera: ZWO ASI183MC color astronomy camera
                      Exposure: Live stack of 137, 5 second frames (11.4 minutes)
                      Processing: Dark frame subtraction and color balance in Photoshop Elements

                      For the Orion Nebula, the same scope, mount and camera as above was used. The exposure was a live stack of 58, 5 second frames (4.8 minutes). Processing: Dark frame subtraction and color balance in Photoshop Elements.

                      Bill, do you need the original PNG files (they are 7.6 and 12.9 megabytes respectively)? These files were the ones submitted originally in the forum. Also I would use the second Orion photo I posted above as it has the dark frame subtraction correction.

                      #14507
                      Mike C:
                      Keymaster

                        Just wanted to share an image from yesterday’s eclipse! Most of the photos turned out really blurry. Really tough to focus when it’s mostly cloudy, but I’m pretty happy with what I got.

                         

                        #14510
                        bwyman
                        Participant

                          Hey Mike, thanks for sharing the eclipse photos. I was only counting 3 groups of sunspots in that first photo. I was about to check my scribbles, but the second photo confirms (and numbers) the five sunspot groupings I thought I eventually noted.

                          Who took photos of the group at the eclipse event? I thought I saw two different people snap a photo of us as a group.

                           

                          #14511
                          bdavidson
                          Participant

                            I was taking photos of the group at Watson.

                            #14512
                            fealeybob14
                            Participant

                              Nice eclipse pics Mike. Bill, see my post above.
                              Last night I took another look at M 33 in Triangulum; it is well placed for imaging. Good article in Nov Sky and Telescope too. Below image is 307 5 second live stacked frames with dark frame correction taken with the 80mm ED refractor and ASI 183MC camera. A light cloudiness was present at the time of imaging.

                              #14529
                              fealeybob14
                              Participant

                                Must say I am obsessed with the galaxy M33 in Triangulum especially the structural detail one can obtain using a small refractor (AT80mmED) and live stacking images taken with a modest astronomy camera (ASI ZWO183MC) and an accurate, polar aligned tracking mount (Sky Watcher Star Adventurer Gti). In the image below (a live-stack of 501, 5 second frames) many star-forming regions are visible in the spiral arms including the huge nebula NGC 604 (white arrow), about 1,500 light years in diameter!). I would next love to obtain a hydrogen alpha filter and then obtain images highlighting the star forming areas better.
                                As mentioned previously, the November 2023 issue of Sky & Telescope features M33 in the Observer’s Guide section (p 58-65) and on p 41.

                                #14539
                                fealeybob14
                                Participant

                                  A tale of two Messiers: M 97 also known as the Owl Nebula and M 108 a starburst galaxy also known as the Surfboard galaxy are within a degree of each other in Ursa Major. The image was taken with the AT80ED refractor and ZWO 183MC camera on 12/7 at midnight (or so). I used Stellarium as a source for the star labels.

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